Character of the Southern States of America: Letter to a Friend Who Had Joined the Southern Independence Association F W Newman

ISBN: 9781331431961

Published: September 27th 2015

Paperback

26 pages


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Character of the Southern States of America: Letter to a Friend Who Had Joined the Southern Independence Association  by  F W Newman

Character of the Southern States of America: Letter to a Friend Who Had Joined the Southern Independence Association by F W Newman
September 27th 2015 | Paperback | PDF, EPUB, FB2, DjVu, AUDIO, mp3, RTF | 26 pages | ISBN: 9781331431961 | 9.49 Mb

Excerpt from Character of the Southern States of America: Letter to a Friend Who Had Joined the Southern Independence AssociationAfter this, they voted that Texas should enter the Union- and the intrigues of the Southern party accepted the gift,MoreExcerpt from Character of the Southern States of America: Letter to a Friend Who Had Joined the Southern Independence AssociationAfter this, they voted that Texas should enter the Union- and the intrigues of the Southern party accepted the gift, against the indignant protests of the free party of the North.

The Mexican war which followed, politically was not worse than our Asiatic wars, but about as bad. It was nevertheless entered into (as I understand) by a breach of the constitution, and against the utmost effort of all that party of the North which is now in power- and it aimed avowedly at the extension of slavery, which cannot be said of us, in our worst wickedness. Victorious in this war, the South endeavoured, but failed in the endeavour, to establish slavery in California.

After this came the buccaneering attacks on Cuba and Nicaragua, the ferocious marauding against Kanzas, also the Ostend congress of the American ministers in Europe, which but a few years back was accepted by all England as nothing short of an apotheosis of unlimited filibustering. This would suffice to justify my comparing the Slave Power to buccaneers.

But I must not stop there. All their leading men, all who are the soul and impetus of this secession, are avowed defenders of the African slave trade. Their President rejects with indignant disdain the idea of its being morally wrong, and avows that it is a mere question of time and of prudence. The Vice-President emphatically points out the uselessness of lands which they cannot people, and that to obtain new masses of the African race is matter of vital importance. Their (foreign) Secretary of State, Mr. Judah Benjamin, has written to his agent, the Hon. L. Q. C. Lamar, the commissioner at St.

Petersburg, strictly prohibiting any treaty-stipulations against the African Slave Trade. The celebrated writer, the Hon. L. W. Spratt, author of the Philosophy of Secession, and the most influential literary politician of the South, insists that that trade is morally, commercially and politically, of the first necessity- and believes that the South may snap its fingers at Europe, because we shall pocket our profits from the trade and our consciences together.

(I hope you are not willing to give him new grounds for his confidence.) The go-ahead Georgian statesmen are as eager for the trade as is their greatest intellect, Mr. Stephens. All the interests of all the States, which are not already wholly conquered, are for it, except Virginia, who seceded last, and largely under military compulsion. It is therefore certain, that if the remnant could succeed in establishing their independence, they would quickly re-open that trade, which is the worst and most wicked form of buccaneering that has yet existed on earth.

Mr. W. H. Russell, the celebrated correspondent of the Times, - who was sent to America to write the North down and the South up, as soon as it pleased his masters to adopt that line, - was not willing to allow the letters which appeared in the Times, as his, to speak for him longer than 18 months. After they had done their work in its columns, he published his own Diary, which depicts the Southerners as bloody treacherous barbarians. Compared with his account of their truculence, the word buccaneer seems to me feeble.About the PublisherForgotten Books publishes hundreds of thousands of rare and classic books.

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